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Download e-book for iPad: A Cornish Anthology by A. L. Rowse (auth.)

By A. L. Rowse (auth.)

ISBN-10: 1349152811

ISBN-13: 9781349152810

ISBN-10: 1349152838

ISBN-13: 9781349152834

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But it is from the downs, or from the croft which lies between the cottage and the sea, that I like best to see the day end. From the downs, or from the road just above the cottage, the sky has often that amber light which Coleridge notes in his poems; with infinite gradations of green, and a strange heaping of sullen and bodiless clouds against pure brightness. From the fields at Carleon, between the valley and the sea, night is seen touching the valley into a gentle and glowing harmony. The valley, a deep dell sunk into the midst of a circle of rocks covered with thin green foliage, is a nest and bower of soft trees, which rise cluster above cluster almost to the edge of the sky, where the rocky line of the field ends it.

But one day in the week before Christmas, when I had a dozen jobs on hand but no inclination to tackle any of them, I saddled Joey and rode in search of Dozmary Pool. The moor is little known, and has few show places; and when you have climbed Brown Willy, the highest hill in Cornwall, there is nothing to do but visit this curious little lake, into which Sir Bedivere is said to have thrown the sword Excalibur. The pool is easily found, lying close to the road from Bolventor to St. Neot, and in summer is much frequented by tourists; but I saw it lonely as a Highland loch and almost as beautiful.

They never pass one another without stopping to talk, and every one of them greets you with the time of the day as you pass. All day long the tree before the door of the cottage is filled with music, and at night, when the moon is up, the sky before the windows is flooded with strange shapes and motions of light. I have never seen the moon's magic so nimbly or so continuously at work as upon that space of sky where the higher ridges of the croft ended. Kingdoms and seas of cloud passed before us under that calm radiance; they passed, leaving the sky clear for the stars; the polar star stood over the cottage, and the Great Bear flung out his paws at the moon.

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A Cornish Anthology by A. L. Rowse (auth.)


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